In the ideal Scandinavian society, every man is his brother’s keeper; the welfare state is in theory a place of broad, inclusive wellbeing for every child, man, and woman. Utopian in its ambition, one is inclined to expect it depicted as such on the silver screen as well. However, in Tomas Alfredson’s Let The Right One In, that social inclusion and sense of communal belonging is lost in the mid-winter darkness, and instead, adolescent loneliness and familial disconnection reigns.

Alfredson’s Swedish suburb Blackeberg is like its name suggests, a . . .

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Mikkel Frederiksen is an English Literature graduate from Montreal. He resides in Copenhagen.