A documentary about Norway’s 2011 Utøya massacre has received funding in the latest round from the Swedish Film Institute.

Titled Reconstructing Utøya, the documentary will feature five of the original campers from Utøya. They will describe what happened to them and how they came out alive. In 2011, Norwegian right-wing extremist Anders Breivik, dressed in a fake police uniform, blew up a 950kg bomb in front of the State Minister’s Office and the Ministry of Justice and Police in Oslo. Seven people were killed and fifteen were injured. He then drove to the island of Utøya, where the Norwegian Labour Party’s youth association had organised a summer camp. He began to shoot participants, and killed sixty-nine and injured sixty-six. The documentary will have them direct a group of twelve youths into reenacting how they survived. Beyond the stage, the documentary will follow how the survivors, contributors and film team bond.

The documentary will have the survivors direct a group of twelve youths into reenacting how they survived. Beyond the stage, the documentary will follow how the survivors, contributors and film team bond. The documentary has similar vibes to the recent American documentary Casting JonBenet, in which actors auditioning for a movie explain how they perceive the characters, as well as Joshua Oppenheimer’s The Act of Killing. where former death-squad leaders reenact mass killings through cinema. Reconstructing Utøya will instead allow for the survivors to highlight the events of the day as well as their bravery.